New recipes

Make Meals More Flavorful with Healthy Miso

Make Meals More Flavorful with Healthy Miso


Although many people have slurped some miso soup or eaten sticky, miso-glazed cod in a restaurant, it’s less common to actually find miso in Western kitchens. Start stocking some in your own fridge, and you’ll soon find that there’s so much more you can do with this ancient Asian flavor-booster. Miso is made by fermenting soybeans and rice or barley into a thick, flavorful paste that’s similar in texture to nut butters. Adding versatile miso to recipes not only adds rich, salty flavor, but also serves as a source of protein, fiber, and the minerals zinc, manganese, phosphorus and copper. Studies suggest that compounds found in fermented soybean-based foods, like miso, may even provide a cancer-protective benefit, as well.

Miso can range in color from white to yellow to reddish-brown, and the color and flavor intensity varies depending on the fermentation process. Lighter varieties are less salty and more mellow, while darker miso is saltier and more pungent. You can find miso at natural food stores, Asian markets, and some supermarkets. It’s generally sold in tightly-sealed plastic or glass containers which will stay fresh in the fridge for up to a year.

Homemade miso soup is quick and easy to prepare: Just heat miso and water (or the Japanese soup stock called dashi, if desired) over low to medium heat. Enjoy it plain, or stir in some cubed tofu, sliced mushrooms, or chopped scallions. Make savory sandwiches by simply spreading miso on bread and topping it with tahini; sliced avocado makes a great addition. Add miso to the water when cooking beans, brown rice or other grains, or mix it with white sesame paste (found in Asian markets) and toss it with cooked veggies or noodles. Add miso to marinades or stir-fries, or mix it with vegetable oil, rice wine vinegar, honey, and grated ginger to make an Asian-inspired salad dressing. And yes, miso makes a delicious glaze for salmon, cod, or halibut. Mix miso with soy sauce and brown sugar or honey; brush onto fish fillets and broil. Top with sesame seeds, if desired.

Click here for more miso recipes.


Make Meals More Flavorful with Healthy Miso - Recipes

Posted by Susan Bowerman, M.S., RD, CSSD, CSOWM, FAND – Senior Director, Worldwide Nutrition Education and Training />0 Comment

Make a delicious miso salad dressing.

Miso is a versatile ingredient that can boost nutrition and add a depth of flavor to a variety of dishes.

Even if you’re not familiar with miso, there’s a good possibility that you’ve eaten it. Have you ever been served a clear soup at the start of a meal in a Japanese restaurant? Chances are good that it was made with miso. Miso means “fermented beans,” and it is essentially a fermented soybean paste – and, when miso is dissolved into hot water (usually with other seasonings added), it becomes the soup that many people are familiar with.

What Exactly Is Miso?

Miso is usually made from soybeans and a grain (typically rice or barley) that has been fermented with a common fungus called Aspergillus oryzae (also used to make rice vinegar and soy sauce).

During fermentation, various compounds are produced that give miso its distinctive aroma and flavor. Depending on how long the mixture is allowed to ferment, the color and flavor of miso varies. Most American supermarkets carry miso that is labeled either “white” or “red” – which isn’t quite accurate – white miso is more beige or pale yellow in color, and red miso is actually brown. The longer the miso ferments, the deeper the color and the richer the flavor. So white miso is relatively mild, and red miso has a deeper flavor (and it’s also saltier).

If you’re fortunate enough to have an Asian supermarket in your neighborhood, you will probably see other types of miso. Some are made with beans other than soy (such as chickpeas or black beans), and some may contain buckwheat, rye or millet as a grain source rather than rice or barley.

Why Should You Eat Miso?

Aside from its ability to impart flavor to many different dishes, miso has some nutrition benefits, too. Because it’s fermented, miso paste contains the “good” probiotic bacteria that help promote digestive health. In addition, the fermentation process partially breaks down the proteins, fats and carbohydrates that are in the beans and grains, making these nutrients more readily available to the body and yielding a bit more protein than what is present in unfermented soybeans.

A tablespoon of miso has about 25 calories, 1 gram of protein and 4 grams of carbohydrate, with small amounts calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, vitamin K, zinc, iron and B vitamins. But it is rather high in sodium – a tablespoon has about 600 milligrams of sodium – but, in terms of flavor, a little goes a long way.

How Do I Use Miso?

Miso is more than simply a soup base. Its earthy, rich taste adds a depth of flavor to all kinds of foods. The milder white miso is best for soup, but it also adds terrific flavor to salad dressings and marinades, or as a seasoning for veggies. Dark miso is better for longer cooking dishes like stews, soups and braises.

Miso should be stored in the refrigerator, tightly sealed, where it will retain its quality for a long time – more than a year. After that time, it’s still safe to eat, although there may be some slight changes to the flavor or color. You can put some plastic wrap over the surface of the miso before replacing the lid to prevent it from darkening.

Here are 5 ways you can use miso in your everyday cooking:


Make Meals More Flavorful with Healthy Miso - Recipes

Posted by Susan Bowerman, M.S., RD, CSSD, CSOWM, FAND – Senior Director, Worldwide Nutrition Education and Training />0 Comment

Make a delicious miso salad dressing.

Miso is a versatile ingredient that can boost nutrition and add a depth of flavor to a variety of dishes.

Even if you’re not familiar with miso, there’s a good possibility that you’ve eaten it. Have you ever been served a clear soup at the start of a meal in a Japanese restaurant? Chances are good that it was made with miso. Miso means “fermented beans,” and it is essentially a fermented soybean paste – and, when miso is dissolved into hot water (usually with other seasonings added), it becomes the soup that many people are familiar with.

What Exactly Is Miso?

Miso is usually made from soybeans and a grain (typically rice or barley) that has been fermented with a common fungus called Aspergillus oryzae (also used to make rice vinegar and soy sauce).

During fermentation, various compounds are produced that give miso its distinctive aroma and flavor. Depending on how long the mixture is allowed to ferment, the color and flavor of miso varies. Most American supermarkets carry miso that is labeled either “white” or “red” – which isn’t quite accurate – white miso is more beige or pale yellow in color, and red miso is actually brown. The longer the miso ferments, the deeper the color and the richer the flavor. So white miso is relatively mild, and red miso has a deeper flavor (and it’s also saltier).

If you’re fortunate enough to have an Asian supermarket in your neighborhood, you will probably see other types of miso. Some are made with beans other than soy (such as chickpeas or black beans), and some may contain buckwheat, rye or millet as a grain source rather than rice or barley.

Why Should You Eat Miso?

Aside from its ability to impart flavor to many different dishes, miso has some nutrition benefits, too. Because it’s fermented, miso paste contains the “good” probiotic bacteria that help promote digestive health. In addition, the fermentation process partially breaks down the proteins, fats and carbohydrates that are in the beans and grains, making these nutrients more readily available to the body and yielding a bit more protein than what is present in unfermented soybeans.

A tablespoon of miso has about 25 calories, 1 gram of protein and 4 grams of carbohydrate, with small amounts calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, vitamin K, zinc, iron and B vitamins. But it is rather high in sodium – a tablespoon has about 600 milligrams of sodium – but, in terms of flavor, a little goes a long way.

How Do I Use Miso?

Miso is more than simply a soup base. Its earthy, rich taste adds a depth of flavor to all kinds of foods. The milder white miso is best for soup, but it also adds terrific flavor to salad dressings and marinades, or as a seasoning for veggies. Dark miso is better for longer cooking dishes like stews, soups and braises.

Miso should be stored in the refrigerator, tightly sealed, where it will retain its quality for a long time – more than a year. After that time, it’s still safe to eat, although there may be some slight changes to the flavor or color. You can put some plastic wrap over the surface of the miso before replacing the lid to prevent it from darkening.

Here are 5 ways you can use miso in your everyday cooking:


Make Meals More Flavorful with Healthy Miso - Recipes

Posted by Susan Bowerman, M.S., RD, CSSD, CSOWM, FAND – Senior Director, Worldwide Nutrition Education and Training />0 Comment

Make a delicious miso salad dressing.

Miso is a versatile ingredient that can boost nutrition and add a depth of flavor to a variety of dishes.

Even if you’re not familiar with miso, there’s a good possibility that you’ve eaten it. Have you ever been served a clear soup at the start of a meal in a Japanese restaurant? Chances are good that it was made with miso. Miso means “fermented beans,” and it is essentially a fermented soybean paste – and, when miso is dissolved into hot water (usually with other seasonings added), it becomes the soup that many people are familiar with.

What Exactly Is Miso?

Miso is usually made from soybeans and a grain (typically rice or barley) that has been fermented with a common fungus called Aspergillus oryzae (also used to make rice vinegar and soy sauce).

During fermentation, various compounds are produced that give miso its distinctive aroma and flavor. Depending on how long the mixture is allowed to ferment, the color and flavor of miso varies. Most American supermarkets carry miso that is labeled either “white” or “red” – which isn’t quite accurate – white miso is more beige or pale yellow in color, and red miso is actually brown. The longer the miso ferments, the deeper the color and the richer the flavor. So white miso is relatively mild, and red miso has a deeper flavor (and it’s also saltier).

If you’re fortunate enough to have an Asian supermarket in your neighborhood, you will probably see other types of miso. Some are made with beans other than soy (such as chickpeas or black beans), and some may contain buckwheat, rye or millet as a grain source rather than rice or barley.

Why Should You Eat Miso?

Aside from its ability to impart flavor to many different dishes, miso has some nutrition benefits, too. Because it’s fermented, miso paste contains the “good” probiotic bacteria that help promote digestive health. In addition, the fermentation process partially breaks down the proteins, fats and carbohydrates that are in the beans and grains, making these nutrients more readily available to the body and yielding a bit more protein than what is present in unfermented soybeans.

A tablespoon of miso has about 25 calories, 1 gram of protein and 4 grams of carbohydrate, with small amounts calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, vitamin K, zinc, iron and B vitamins. But it is rather high in sodium – a tablespoon has about 600 milligrams of sodium – but, in terms of flavor, a little goes a long way.

How Do I Use Miso?

Miso is more than simply a soup base. Its earthy, rich taste adds a depth of flavor to all kinds of foods. The milder white miso is best for soup, but it also adds terrific flavor to salad dressings and marinades, or as a seasoning for veggies. Dark miso is better for longer cooking dishes like stews, soups and braises.

Miso should be stored in the refrigerator, tightly sealed, where it will retain its quality for a long time – more than a year. After that time, it’s still safe to eat, although there may be some slight changes to the flavor or color. You can put some plastic wrap over the surface of the miso before replacing the lid to prevent it from darkening.

Here are 5 ways you can use miso in your everyday cooking:


Make Meals More Flavorful with Healthy Miso - Recipes

Posted by Susan Bowerman, M.S., RD, CSSD, CSOWM, FAND – Senior Director, Worldwide Nutrition Education and Training />0 Comment

Make a delicious miso salad dressing.

Miso is a versatile ingredient that can boost nutrition and add a depth of flavor to a variety of dishes.

Even if you’re not familiar with miso, there’s a good possibility that you’ve eaten it. Have you ever been served a clear soup at the start of a meal in a Japanese restaurant? Chances are good that it was made with miso. Miso means “fermented beans,” and it is essentially a fermented soybean paste – and, when miso is dissolved into hot water (usually with other seasonings added), it becomes the soup that many people are familiar with.

What Exactly Is Miso?

Miso is usually made from soybeans and a grain (typically rice or barley) that has been fermented with a common fungus called Aspergillus oryzae (also used to make rice vinegar and soy sauce).

During fermentation, various compounds are produced that give miso its distinctive aroma and flavor. Depending on how long the mixture is allowed to ferment, the color and flavor of miso varies. Most American supermarkets carry miso that is labeled either “white” or “red” – which isn’t quite accurate – white miso is more beige or pale yellow in color, and red miso is actually brown. The longer the miso ferments, the deeper the color and the richer the flavor. So white miso is relatively mild, and red miso has a deeper flavor (and it’s also saltier).

If you’re fortunate enough to have an Asian supermarket in your neighborhood, you will probably see other types of miso. Some are made with beans other than soy (such as chickpeas or black beans), and some may contain buckwheat, rye or millet as a grain source rather than rice or barley.

Why Should You Eat Miso?

Aside from its ability to impart flavor to many different dishes, miso has some nutrition benefits, too. Because it’s fermented, miso paste contains the “good” probiotic bacteria that help promote digestive health. In addition, the fermentation process partially breaks down the proteins, fats and carbohydrates that are in the beans and grains, making these nutrients more readily available to the body and yielding a bit more protein than what is present in unfermented soybeans.

A tablespoon of miso has about 25 calories, 1 gram of protein and 4 grams of carbohydrate, with small amounts calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, vitamin K, zinc, iron and B vitamins. But it is rather high in sodium – a tablespoon has about 600 milligrams of sodium – but, in terms of flavor, a little goes a long way.

How Do I Use Miso?

Miso is more than simply a soup base. Its earthy, rich taste adds a depth of flavor to all kinds of foods. The milder white miso is best for soup, but it also adds terrific flavor to salad dressings and marinades, or as a seasoning for veggies. Dark miso is better for longer cooking dishes like stews, soups and braises.

Miso should be stored in the refrigerator, tightly sealed, where it will retain its quality for a long time – more than a year. After that time, it’s still safe to eat, although there may be some slight changes to the flavor or color. You can put some plastic wrap over the surface of the miso before replacing the lid to prevent it from darkening.

Here are 5 ways you can use miso in your everyday cooking:


Make Meals More Flavorful with Healthy Miso - Recipes

Posted by Susan Bowerman, M.S., RD, CSSD, CSOWM, FAND – Senior Director, Worldwide Nutrition Education and Training />0 Comment

Make a delicious miso salad dressing.

Miso is a versatile ingredient that can boost nutrition and add a depth of flavor to a variety of dishes.

Even if you’re not familiar with miso, there’s a good possibility that you’ve eaten it. Have you ever been served a clear soup at the start of a meal in a Japanese restaurant? Chances are good that it was made with miso. Miso means “fermented beans,” and it is essentially a fermented soybean paste – and, when miso is dissolved into hot water (usually with other seasonings added), it becomes the soup that many people are familiar with.

What Exactly Is Miso?

Miso is usually made from soybeans and a grain (typically rice or barley) that has been fermented with a common fungus called Aspergillus oryzae (also used to make rice vinegar and soy sauce).

During fermentation, various compounds are produced that give miso its distinctive aroma and flavor. Depending on how long the mixture is allowed to ferment, the color and flavor of miso varies. Most American supermarkets carry miso that is labeled either “white” or “red” – which isn’t quite accurate – white miso is more beige or pale yellow in color, and red miso is actually brown. The longer the miso ferments, the deeper the color and the richer the flavor. So white miso is relatively mild, and red miso has a deeper flavor (and it’s also saltier).

If you’re fortunate enough to have an Asian supermarket in your neighborhood, you will probably see other types of miso. Some are made with beans other than soy (such as chickpeas or black beans), and some may contain buckwheat, rye or millet as a grain source rather than rice or barley.

Why Should You Eat Miso?

Aside from its ability to impart flavor to many different dishes, miso has some nutrition benefits, too. Because it’s fermented, miso paste contains the “good” probiotic bacteria that help promote digestive health. In addition, the fermentation process partially breaks down the proteins, fats and carbohydrates that are in the beans and grains, making these nutrients more readily available to the body and yielding a bit more protein than what is present in unfermented soybeans.

A tablespoon of miso has about 25 calories, 1 gram of protein and 4 grams of carbohydrate, with small amounts calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, vitamin K, zinc, iron and B vitamins. But it is rather high in sodium – a tablespoon has about 600 milligrams of sodium – but, in terms of flavor, a little goes a long way.

How Do I Use Miso?

Miso is more than simply a soup base. Its earthy, rich taste adds a depth of flavor to all kinds of foods. The milder white miso is best for soup, but it also adds terrific flavor to salad dressings and marinades, or as a seasoning for veggies. Dark miso is better for longer cooking dishes like stews, soups and braises.

Miso should be stored in the refrigerator, tightly sealed, where it will retain its quality for a long time – more than a year. After that time, it’s still safe to eat, although there may be some slight changes to the flavor or color. You can put some plastic wrap over the surface of the miso before replacing the lid to prevent it from darkening.

Here are 5 ways you can use miso in your everyday cooking:


Make Meals More Flavorful with Healthy Miso - Recipes

Posted by Susan Bowerman, M.S., RD, CSSD, CSOWM, FAND – Senior Director, Worldwide Nutrition Education and Training />0 Comment

Make a delicious miso salad dressing.

Miso is a versatile ingredient that can boost nutrition and add a depth of flavor to a variety of dishes.

Even if you’re not familiar with miso, there’s a good possibility that you’ve eaten it. Have you ever been served a clear soup at the start of a meal in a Japanese restaurant? Chances are good that it was made with miso. Miso means “fermented beans,” and it is essentially a fermented soybean paste – and, when miso is dissolved into hot water (usually with other seasonings added), it becomes the soup that many people are familiar with.

What Exactly Is Miso?

Miso is usually made from soybeans and a grain (typically rice or barley) that has been fermented with a common fungus called Aspergillus oryzae (also used to make rice vinegar and soy sauce).

During fermentation, various compounds are produced that give miso its distinctive aroma and flavor. Depending on how long the mixture is allowed to ferment, the color and flavor of miso varies. Most American supermarkets carry miso that is labeled either “white” or “red” – which isn’t quite accurate – white miso is more beige or pale yellow in color, and red miso is actually brown. The longer the miso ferments, the deeper the color and the richer the flavor. So white miso is relatively mild, and red miso has a deeper flavor (and it’s also saltier).

If you’re fortunate enough to have an Asian supermarket in your neighborhood, you will probably see other types of miso. Some are made with beans other than soy (such as chickpeas or black beans), and some may contain buckwheat, rye or millet as a grain source rather than rice or barley.

Why Should You Eat Miso?

Aside from its ability to impart flavor to many different dishes, miso has some nutrition benefits, too. Because it’s fermented, miso paste contains the “good” probiotic bacteria that help promote digestive health. In addition, the fermentation process partially breaks down the proteins, fats and carbohydrates that are in the beans and grains, making these nutrients more readily available to the body and yielding a bit more protein than what is present in unfermented soybeans.

A tablespoon of miso has about 25 calories, 1 gram of protein and 4 grams of carbohydrate, with small amounts calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, vitamin K, zinc, iron and B vitamins. But it is rather high in sodium – a tablespoon has about 600 milligrams of sodium – but, in terms of flavor, a little goes a long way.

How Do I Use Miso?

Miso is more than simply a soup base. Its earthy, rich taste adds a depth of flavor to all kinds of foods. The milder white miso is best for soup, but it also adds terrific flavor to salad dressings and marinades, or as a seasoning for veggies. Dark miso is better for longer cooking dishes like stews, soups and braises.

Miso should be stored in the refrigerator, tightly sealed, where it will retain its quality for a long time – more than a year. After that time, it’s still safe to eat, although there may be some slight changes to the flavor or color. You can put some plastic wrap over the surface of the miso before replacing the lid to prevent it from darkening.

Here are 5 ways you can use miso in your everyday cooking:


Make Meals More Flavorful with Healthy Miso - Recipes

Posted by Susan Bowerman, M.S., RD, CSSD, CSOWM, FAND – Senior Director, Worldwide Nutrition Education and Training />0 Comment

Make a delicious miso salad dressing.

Miso is a versatile ingredient that can boost nutrition and add a depth of flavor to a variety of dishes.

Even if you’re not familiar with miso, there’s a good possibility that you’ve eaten it. Have you ever been served a clear soup at the start of a meal in a Japanese restaurant? Chances are good that it was made with miso. Miso means “fermented beans,” and it is essentially a fermented soybean paste – and, when miso is dissolved into hot water (usually with other seasonings added), it becomes the soup that many people are familiar with.

What Exactly Is Miso?

Miso is usually made from soybeans and a grain (typically rice or barley) that has been fermented with a common fungus called Aspergillus oryzae (also used to make rice vinegar and soy sauce).

During fermentation, various compounds are produced that give miso its distinctive aroma and flavor. Depending on how long the mixture is allowed to ferment, the color and flavor of miso varies. Most American supermarkets carry miso that is labeled either “white” or “red” – which isn’t quite accurate – white miso is more beige or pale yellow in color, and red miso is actually brown. The longer the miso ferments, the deeper the color and the richer the flavor. So white miso is relatively mild, and red miso has a deeper flavor (and it’s also saltier).

If you’re fortunate enough to have an Asian supermarket in your neighborhood, you will probably see other types of miso. Some are made with beans other than soy (such as chickpeas or black beans), and some may contain buckwheat, rye or millet as a grain source rather than rice or barley.

Why Should You Eat Miso?

Aside from its ability to impart flavor to many different dishes, miso has some nutrition benefits, too. Because it’s fermented, miso paste contains the “good” probiotic bacteria that help promote digestive health. In addition, the fermentation process partially breaks down the proteins, fats and carbohydrates that are in the beans and grains, making these nutrients more readily available to the body and yielding a bit more protein than what is present in unfermented soybeans.

A tablespoon of miso has about 25 calories, 1 gram of protein and 4 grams of carbohydrate, with small amounts calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, vitamin K, zinc, iron and B vitamins. But it is rather high in sodium – a tablespoon has about 600 milligrams of sodium – but, in terms of flavor, a little goes a long way.

How Do I Use Miso?

Miso is more than simply a soup base. Its earthy, rich taste adds a depth of flavor to all kinds of foods. The milder white miso is best for soup, but it also adds terrific flavor to salad dressings and marinades, or as a seasoning for veggies. Dark miso is better for longer cooking dishes like stews, soups and braises.

Miso should be stored in the refrigerator, tightly sealed, where it will retain its quality for a long time – more than a year. After that time, it’s still safe to eat, although there may be some slight changes to the flavor or color. You can put some plastic wrap over the surface of the miso before replacing the lid to prevent it from darkening.

Here are 5 ways you can use miso in your everyday cooking:


Make Meals More Flavorful with Healthy Miso - Recipes

Posted by Susan Bowerman, M.S., RD, CSSD, CSOWM, FAND – Senior Director, Worldwide Nutrition Education and Training />0 Comment

Make a delicious miso salad dressing.

Miso is a versatile ingredient that can boost nutrition and add a depth of flavor to a variety of dishes.

Even if you’re not familiar with miso, there’s a good possibility that you’ve eaten it. Have you ever been served a clear soup at the start of a meal in a Japanese restaurant? Chances are good that it was made with miso. Miso means “fermented beans,” and it is essentially a fermented soybean paste – and, when miso is dissolved into hot water (usually with other seasonings added), it becomes the soup that many people are familiar with.

What Exactly Is Miso?

Miso is usually made from soybeans and a grain (typically rice or barley) that has been fermented with a common fungus called Aspergillus oryzae (also used to make rice vinegar and soy sauce).

During fermentation, various compounds are produced that give miso its distinctive aroma and flavor. Depending on how long the mixture is allowed to ferment, the color and flavor of miso varies. Most American supermarkets carry miso that is labeled either “white” or “red” – which isn’t quite accurate – white miso is more beige or pale yellow in color, and red miso is actually brown. The longer the miso ferments, the deeper the color and the richer the flavor. So white miso is relatively mild, and red miso has a deeper flavor (and it’s also saltier).

If you’re fortunate enough to have an Asian supermarket in your neighborhood, you will probably see other types of miso. Some are made with beans other than soy (such as chickpeas or black beans), and some may contain buckwheat, rye or millet as a grain source rather than rice or barley.

Why Should You Eat Miso?

Aside from its ability to impart flavor to many different dishes, miso has some nutrition benefits, too. Because it’s fermented, miso paste contains the “good” probiotic bacteria that help promote digestive health. In addition, the fermentation process partially breaks down the proteins, fats and carbohydrates that are in the beans and grains, making these nutrients more readily available to the body and yielding a bit more protein than what is present in unfermented soybeans.

A tablespoon of miso has about 25 calories, 1 gram of protein and 4 grams of carbohydrate, with small amounts calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, vitamin K, zinc, iron and B vitamins. But it is rather high in sodium – a tablespoon has about 600 milligrams of sodium – but, in terms of flavor, a little goes a long way.

How Do I Use Miso?

Miso is more than simply a soup base. Its earthy, rich taste adds a depth of flavor to all kinds of foods. The milder white miso is best for soup, but it also adds terrific flavor to salad dressings and marinades, or as a seasoning for veggies. Dark miso is better for longer cooking dishes like stews, soups and braises.

Miso should be stored in the refrigerator, tightly sealed, where it will retain its quality for a long time – more than a year. After that time, it’s still safe to eat, although there may be some slight changes to the flavor or color. You can put some plastic wrap over the surface of the miso before replacing the lid to prevent it from darkening.

Here are 5 ways you can use miso in your everyday cooking:


Make Meals More Flavorful with Healthy Miso - Recipes

Posted by Susan Bowerman, M.S., RD, CSSD, CSOWM, FAND – Senior Director, Worldwide Nutrition Education and Training />0 Comment

Make a delicious miso salad dressing.

Miso is a versatile ingredient that can boost nutrition and add a depth of flavor to a variety of dishes.

Even if you’re not familiar with miso, there’s a good possibility that you’ve eaten it. Have you ever been served a clear soup at the start of a meal in a Japanese restaurant? Chances are good that it was made with miso. Miso means “fermented beans,” and it is essentially a fermented soybean paste – and, when miso is dissolved into hot water (usually with other seasonings added), it becomes the soup that many people are familiar with.

What Exactly Is Miso?

Miso is usually made from soybeans and a grain (typically rice or barley) that has been fermented with a common fungus called Aspergillus oryzae (also used to make rice vinegar and soy sauce).

During fermentation, various compounds are produced that give miso its distinctive aroma and flavor. Depending on how long the mixture is allowed to ferment, the color and flavor of miso varies. Most American supermarkets carry miso that is labeled either “white” or “red” – which isn’t quite accurate – white miso is more beige or pale yellow in color, and red miso is actually brown. The longer the miso ferments, the deeper the color and the richer the flavor. So white miso is relatively mild, and red miso has a deeper flavor (and it’s also saltier).

If you’re fortunate enough to have an Asian supermarket in your neighborhood, you will probably see other types of miso. Some are made with beans other than soy (such as chickpeas or black beans), and some may contain buckwheat, rye or millet as a grain source rather than rice or barley.

Why Should You Eat Miso?

Aside from its ability to impart flavor to many different dishes, miso has some nutrition benefits, too. Because it’s fermented, miso paste contains the “good” probiotic bacteria that help promote digestive health. In addition, the fermentation process partially breaks down the proteins, fats and carbohydrates that are in the beans and grains, making these nutrients more readily available to the body and yielding a bit more protein than what is present in unfermented soybeans.

A tablespoon of miso has about 25 calories, 1 gram of protein and 4 grams of carbohydrate, with small amounts calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, vitamin K, zinc, iron and B vitamins. But it is rather high in sodium – a tablespoon has about 600 milligrams of sodium – but, in terms of flavor, a little goes a long way.

How Do I Use Miso?

Miso is more than simply a soup base. Its earthy, rich taste adds a depth of flavor to all kinds of foods. The milder white miso is best for soup, but it also adds terrific flavor to salad dressings and marinades, or as a seasoning for veggies. Dark miso is better for longer cooking dishes like stews, soups and braises.

Miso should be stored in the refrigerator, tightly sealed, where it will retain its quality for a long time – more than a year. After that time, it’s still safe to eat, although there may be some slight changes to the flavor or color. You can put some plastic wrap over the surface of the miso before replacing the lid to prevent it from darkening.

Here are 5 ways you can use miso in your everyday cooking:


Make Meals More Flavorful with Healthy Miso - Recipes

Posted by Susan Bowerman, M.S., RD, CSSD, CSOWM, FAND – Senior Director, Worldwide Nutrition Education and Training />0 Comment

Make a delicious miso salad dressing.

Miso is a versatile ingredient that can boost nutrition and add a depth of flavor to a variety of dishes.

Even if you’re not familiar with miso, there’s a good possibility that you’ve eaten it. Have you ever been served a clear soup at the start of a meal in a Japanese restaurant? Chances are good that it was made with miso. Miso means “fermented beans,” and it is essentially a fermented soybean paste – and, when miso is dissolved into hot water (usually with other seasonings added), it becomes the soup that many people are familiar with.

What Exactly Is Miso?

Miso is usually made from soybeans and a grain (typically rice or barley) that has been fermented with a common fungus called Aspergillus oryzae (also used to make rice vinegar and soy sauce).

During fermentation, various compounds are produced that give miso its distinctive aroma and flavor. Depending on how long the mixture is allowed to ferment, the color and flavor of miso varies. Most American supermarkets carry miso that is labeled either “white” or “red” – which isn’t quite accurate – white miso is more beige or pale yellow in color, and red miso is actually brown. The longer the miso ferments, the deeper the color and the richer the flavor. So white miso is relatively mild, and red miso has a deeper flavor (and it’s also saltier).

If you’re fortunate enough to have an Asian supermarket in your neighborhood, you will probably see other types of miso. Some are made with beans other than soy (such as chickpeas or black beans), and some may contain buckwheat, rye or millet as a grain source rather than rice or barley.

Why Should You Eat Miso?

Aside from its ability to impart flavor to many different dishes, miso has some nutrition benefits, too. Because it’s fermented, miso paste contains the “good” probiotic bacteria that help promote digestive health. In addition, the fermentation process partially breaks down the proteins, fats and carbohydrates that are in the beans and grains, making these nutrients more readily available to the body and yielding a bit more protein than what is present in unfermented soybeans.

A tablespoon of miso has about 25 calories, 1 gram of protein and 4 grams of carbohydrate, with small amounts calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, vitamin K, zinc, iron and B vitamins. But it is rather high in sodium – a tablespoon has about 600 milligrams of sodium – but, in terms of flavor, a little goes a long way.

How Do I Use Miso?

Miso is more than simply a soup base. Its earthy, rich taste adds a depth of flavor to all kinds of foods. The milder white miso is best for soup, but it also adds terrific flavor to salad dressings and marinades, or as a seasoning for veggies. Dark miso is better for longer cooking dishes like stews, soups and braises.

Miso should be stored in the refrigerator, tightly sealed, where it will retain its quality for a long time – more than a year. After that time, it’s still safe to eat, although there may be some slight changes to the flavor or color. You can put some plastic wrap over the surface of the miso before replacing the lid to prevent it from darkening.

Here are 5 ways you can use miso in your everyday cooking: