New recipes

Who Shaves Andrew Zimmern's Head?

Who Shaves Andrew Zimmern's Head?


Good-natured and approachable, food television personality Andrew Zimmern is a fun guy to interview. He seems to have been everywhere (and eaten everything when he's been there) and he's passionate, knowledgeable, and humble about food. And well, he just seems like a good guy. Take for example, his willingness to answer over and over again fans' questions about the worst things he's ever eaten, and to not take the question of whether he shaves his own head seriously. So this preview interview with the celebrity chef and TV host, looking forward to the South Beach Wine & Food Festival and his participation in it, was a good time (note to beginning food journos, when you end the interview laughing, it's probably a good one).

In this interview (part of a series leading up to the festival launch) among quite a few other things, Zimmern was happy to talk about his upcoming South Beach Wine & Food Festival events in Miami, that city's best-kept food secret (forget Enriqueta's and David's Café), discuss the number of times he eats durian every year, explain how goat is like soccer, where he'd never like to return to (well, not quite), Minnesota's up-and-coming restaurant scene, and his own expansion plans into airports and stadiums. Read on for all these good bits and more.

You're participating in three events, two of them demos at the Grand Tasting, can you tell us a little about them?
One day I'm doing Asian street food, and the next day I'm doing South American... Latin street food. In the world I live in you submit these kinds of things six months previous to the actual events. I'm pretty sure I'm doing a demo on Saturday and then a demo on Sunday under one of those big tents on the main drag there. I love demoing stuff that I see on the road and can then sort of make real for the home cook without sacrificing honesty and authenticity. Just because it's honest and authenic doesn't make it good, but it's a heck of a great place to start.

And the dishes you'll be preparing?
I'll be doing a quick and easy Dehli egg bake with saag paneer for the Fun and Fit as a Family kids demo, and seafood tempura and vegetables at the Grand Tasting.

What sets Miami apart from all other cities, food-wise?
The food in Miami is singular. Remember that Miami is the unofficial capitol of South America.

How do you mean?
Well, just take a look at the population! I mean, you can expand that — the Caribbean, pan-Latin American, Central and South American populations there dwarf all the others when they're added together. Now I mean look, if you go up in the Panhandle you'll find some old guy frying mullet roe by the side of the road, but other than that, the majority of the food experiences, especially in the South, is really dictated these days by Latin influence. Now that makes perfect sense, and I really believe in eating what's around you, and the contributions that are made to the national food discourse from the Latin influence in food in Southern Florida are epic. So I mean, when I go to Miami, I look forward to going to El Palacio De Los Jugos and having their great chicarrons and going to the great little one lechon stall that's right there as you walk in. I mean that's how I like to eat when I'm there.

Good segue to the next question. which is are there any restaurants in Miami that you're particularly interested in hitting this time?
I will try to eat wherever Michelle Bernstein is cooking. If I make it to one meal this time, its Michy’s. That's where I'm going. I just think that she's one of the best cooks in America. I adore her food.

What about her food is so singular?
Michelle has an incredible incredible knack... not only does she have expert technique but she has great taste buds as well. And I know that sounds like every chef should cook that way, but she's able to cook things from the soul and balance things in terms of flavor and texture contrast with just a limited number of ingredients that I think is the envy of every chef who gets to taste her food. Her ability to season so appropriately and her tatse buds are so refined... you know those games that they play on those cheftestant shows where they blindfold them and make them taste a bunch of stuff? I always think Michelle Bernstein would win that if you put the100 best culinarians in the country against each other — she would win that. I was joking with a friend last year... my money would be on Michelle Bernstein. I've never been around a chef, and I've been around them all — the most famous names, the least famous, the most highly regarded — and I've had the opportunity the last couple years, to be with Michelle when she's tasting food that she's about to serve... she made it to finals ofthe Cochon 555 in Aspen last year, we also did an event together at the Marlins' stadium last year, and I got to taste her food while she was cooking samples of it before the doors opened, with her staff, trying to get the seasoning and the garnish exactly where she wanted it... she thinks about food and executes at a level that I just find amazing. She's a very special talent.

What's your favorite part about the South Beach Wine & Food Festival? Is there any one event you look forward to more than others?
The after-parties. I lead a very sedentary lifestyle in the Twin Cities of Minneapolis and when I'm not home, I'm on the road shooting my show. So I go to bed early and wake up early. What I love the most about being away at the food festival is I get to stay out 'til three in the morning and have fun. Now that being said, yes it's work, but I love being out amongst the people. I think if you do what I do for a living and you don't genuinely like people you should be in a different business.

That comes across. You're a well-liked guy, an approachable guy, and I imagine that wherever you go, people come up to you and think you're their best friend.
Well you know, it's funny what TV does. I get to come into peoples' homes all the time, and I'm a culinarian that doesn't do a food demo show, so that is a very unique place to be. There aren't many of us who do a food show where we're not cooking all the time. You know, if people saw me cooking all the time, they'd go, you know, "I don't like this," or, "I saw a better vesrion of that on Barefoot Comtessa," or whatever, I get to be out in the world brining ideas and flavors and experiences into peoples' homes, so I have a blessed place.

Where have you not gotten to that you're really looking to get to? I'm sure that's one of those questions that you're asked all the time, but I haven't heard it.
No, it's a great one. I'm actually not asked that question all the time. I want to spend time in Western Africa. I haven't been to some of the countries there. I'd like to get to Uruguay and Paraguay so I can cross South America as a continent off my list. I also have only been to China about 10 or 11 times, and even though I've spent about an average of 10 days per trip there, I haven't even scratched the surface when it comes to travel in that country. And that's one of my favorite things about traveling the world. There so many places that I want to go because I haven't spent enough time there, not because I haven't been there at all.

Is there some place you'd never want to go again?
Oh gosh, no. There isn't. I've had some off experiences. I think I'm the only person in the world to go to Goa, India, and not see what all the fuss was about. But that doesn't mean that I don't want to go back because I mean, how many times do you go to a restaurant that you have some food and it's, you know, it's all right, but you don't see what all the fuss is about, but then you go back and, it's like, "Oh, they had an off night." I would like to go and explore a lot of parts of the world that I only saw one side of. I love India. So I'm dying to go back to the south there, to see if what I saw the first time wasn't the quintessential experience.


Andrew Zimmern's Muffuletta Sandwich

The muffuletta is a classic New Orleans sandwich made famous by Central Grocery, layered with a few different cured meats, provolone and a tangy olive and tomato relish that soaks into the crusty bread. It's a fun, easy and delicious way to feed a crowd.

Technique tip: I like adding a layer of lettuce. I know it's not customary, so leave it out if you're a traditionalist. The sandwich relish gets better the longer it marinates, so allow it to sit overnight in the fridge if you can.

Swap option: It's traditionally made with a two-foot-wide round bread, sliced in half at the waist and filled. If you can find a bread like this, try it. If you're only feeding a few people, you can use a smaller loaf and easily cut this recipe in half.


Bizarre Foods: Delicious Destinations

Andrew uncovers the edible icons of Memphis from BBQ ribs to the Elvis sandwich.

Philadelphia

From iconic cheese steaks to stromboli, Andrew uncovers Philly's famous edibles.

Twin Cities

Walleye, bundt cake and the Jucy Lucy are on tap for Andrew in the Twin Cities.

Providence

Andrew Zimmern reveals the iconic foods of Providence. Local favorites include hot wieners made with a special meat sauce, Johnny cakes, coffee milk, grilled pizza and the legendary Rhode Island clam chowder.

Manila

Andrew reveals Manila's iconic foods, from slow roasted pork to chicken inasal.

Singapore

From chicken rice to fish head curry, Andrew explores Singapore's popular foods.

The ocean and the mountains provide plenty of bounty in Lima. From ceviche made with the freshest fish to ice cream made with exotic tropical fruits, Andrew Zimmern uncovers the most famous foods in this Peruvian city by the sea.

Seattle

Andrew discovers Seattle's iconic foods including Dungeness crab and teriyaki.

Honolulu

Andrew divulges Honolulu's favorite culinary classics. From smoky, tender kalua pig and sweet-tooth-satisfying shave ice to raw fish poke and a Hawaiian favorite spiked with Spam, there's a bounty of multicultural delights.

Marseille

Andrew Zimmern explores Marseille's iconic food. This port city is packed with local delicacies such as fisherman's stew fresh from the Mediterranean, fruity confections fit for royalty and France's answer to pizza.

Tel Aviv

Andrew Zimmern explores the classic tastes of Tel Aviv. Rich in Middle-Eastern tradition, the Israeli city's food is a modern reflection of an ancient culture, featuring crispy falafel and savory schnitzel to world-renowned hummus and sweet malabi.

Albuquerque

Albuquerque is a delicious desert hotspot that's rich in Native American and Spanish traditions and the local cuisine reflects a unique mash-up of cultures. From stacked enchiladas loaded with green chile and a fried egg to spicy Tewa tacos on Indian fry bread, locals in this state say, if there's no chile in the house, there's no food!

Austin

Andrew Zimmern uncovers the one-of-a-kind tastes of Austin, a city known for "keeping things weird." The city excels at meaty classics like barbecued brisket, Texas-style chili and chicken-fried steak.

Bogota

Andrew Zimmern explores the sky-high flavors of Bogota, Colombia. This mountaintop city keeps warm with hearty potato soup, roasted stuffed pork, egg-filled arepas, a unique take on the tamale and cheesy hot chocolate.

Charleston

Andrew Zimmern explores the iconic dishes of Charleston, SC. Known for its low country culinary style and high-class hospitality, this charming city offers coastal classics like shrimp and grits, she-crab soup and, of course, barbecue.

Louisville, Kentucky

Andrew Zimmern unveils the favorite flavors of Louisville, KY. This historic town balances country classics like the Hot Brown and burgoo stew with ingenious icons like derby pie and mutton barbecue for a true taste of Americana.

Houston

Andrew uncovers Houston's eclectic eats. From Tex-Mex steak fajitas and cheesy Czech pastries, to Creole classics, Gulf seafood and Vietnamese-Cajun crawfish, Houston is a flavorful fusion of Wild West, Far East and Deep South.

Portugal

Andrew explores the iconic eats of Lisbon, Portugal, where seafood reigns supreme, from sardines to shellfish feasts. Late-night snacks are piled with pork, soups overflow with sausage and dessert is a religious experience, too.

Sicily

Andrew Zimmern unveils Sicily's edible icons. Known for artisanal comfort food such as crunchy fried rice balls, thick crust pizza, irresistibly creamy cannoli and a pasta that will make you sing, Sicilian cuisine is a timeless treasure made with classic Italian passion.


The 26 Hot Dogs Every Man Must Devour

Oh, God! Hot dogs! Won&rsquot those things kill me!? Relax, buddy. Even the occasional dirty water dog won&rsquot muddy up your health. Plus, it&rsquos not really summer until you&rsquove finished a frankfurter&mdashespecially if it&rsquos one of these penultimate dogs from across the country. Read on. Chow down.

Zimmern's the host of Travel Channel&rsquos Bizarre Foods and host of Top Dog, a New York hot dog competition at this year&rsquos Food Network & Cooking Channel New York City Wine & Food Festival.

I grew up on the dirty water dog. I take mine with brown mustard and sauerkraut. &ldquoSabrett,&rdquo the company that makes the hot dogs, comes from the Latin term Sabrettus meaning &ldquoswimming in fetid water but oddly comforting.&rdquo

Wrapped in bacon and served with onions, tomato, hot green chile salsa, beans, and whatever else you care for, this Phoenix, Arizona, specialty is found everywhere in the city. You&rsquoll see them served on the side of the road, in restaurants, and at bars. But you can find my favorite at Nogales Hot Dogs, a stand at the corner of 20th and Indian School Road.

They&rsquore classic for a reason. I always hit Katz's Delicatessen in NYC for two (they&rsquore small) classics with mustard and kraut. Nathan's makes a great one too.

They serve this winning wiener at Gus's Hot Dogs in Birmingham, Alabama. It&rsquos a charred frank with seasoned beef and onions on top, along with an odd-sweet-stewed-onion-BBQ-style sauce, rumored to have been invented by Gus himself when he opened the stand 75 years ago.

Like the superb hot dog served at Olneyville New York System Restaurant in Providence, Rhode Island, the Bob Dog at Bob&rsquos Drive Inn in LeMars, Iowa, comes with seasoned 'loose-meat' beef, pickles, and cheese, piled atop a Casey's bakery bun. Best of all, the dog is a Wimmer's natural casing dog, one of my favorite tube steaks.

The Dodger Dog at Dodger Stadium, pre-bunned and vended in the seats, is my favorite in the class of pre-made baseball stadium wieners.

Get the Cheese Coney at Blue Ash Chili in Cincinnati. I take mine with cheese, chili, onions, and hot peppers. The chili is seasoned with cumin and cinnamon&mdashthe traditional Cincy style.

I get mine at Seti's Polish Boys in Cleveland. Technically not a hot dog, but I count it. It&rsquos grilled kielbasa, bunned up with BBQ sauce, french fries, and coleslaw.

They call this frankfurter a "Wiener Dun in a Bun" and it has been a Minnesota State Fair classic for generations. It&rsquos like a corn dog, but the batter has more of a pancake vibe. With fresh lemonade, the Pronto Pup a special thing for us Minnesotans.

Head to J. S. Pulliam Barbeque in Winston-Salem, N.C., and order the Chili Slaw Dog. They've been making them for over a hundred years. The dogs are red the buns are buttered and toasted. I order mine with slaw, mustard, onions, and always, always, always a big spooning of Ed's Hot BBQ Sauce.

I love relish. And at Flo's in Cape Neddick, Maine, I order my dog with their famous sweet-and-spicy, house-made relish, plus celery salt. The hot dogs themselves are steamed and spicy with a natural casing.

I serve this one at my food truck, AZ Canteen, so of course I love it. It&rsquos an all-Piedmontese beef hot dog with homemade mustard, pickled hot chiles, tangy Istrian-style cabbage, mint, and roasted vegetable mayo. Order one at Target Field in Minneapolis and at The K in Kansas City where the Royals play. It&rsquos my favorite hot dog of all time. Go figure.


Bizarre Foods Delicious Destinations

Andrew uncovers the edible icons of Memphis from BBQ ribs to the Elvis sandwich.

Philadelphia

Andrew turns to Philadelphia for iconic meals demanding to be loved. From cheese steak to water ice to 'scrapple,' this town's famous flavors and historic recipes will knock out your taste buds.

Twin Cities

Walleye, bundt cake and the Jucy Lucy are on tap for Andrew in the Twin Cities.

Providence

Andrew Zimmern reveals the iconic foods of Providence. Local favorites include hot wieners made with a special meat sauce, Johnny cakes, coffee milk, grilled pizza and the legendary Rhode Island clam chowder.

Manila

Andrew reveals Manila's iconic foods, from slow roasted pork to chicken inasal.

Singapore

Andrew explores Singapore's famous foods. The cuisine illustrates the blend of cultures with dishes like the sweet and savory chili crab, the extravagant fish head curry and the tasty marinated skewered meats known as satay.

The ocean and the mountains provide plenty of bounty in Lima. From ceviche made with the freshest fish to ice cream made with exotic tropical fruits, Andrew Zimmern uncovers the most famous foods in this Peruvian city by the sea.

Seattle

Andrew discovers Seattle's iconic foods including Dungeness crab and teriyaki.

Honolulu

Andrew divulges Honolulu's favorite culinary classics. From smoky, tender kalua pig and sweet-tooth-satisfying shave ice to raw fish poke and a Hawaiian favorite spiked with Spam, there's a bounty of multicultural delights.

Marseille

Andrew Zimmern explores Marseille's iconic food. This port city is packed with local delicacies such as fisherman's stew fresh from the Mediterranean, fruity confections fit for royalty and France's answer to pizza.

Tel Aviv

Andrew Zimmern explores the classic tastes of Tel Aviv. Rich in Middle-Eastern tradition, the Israeli city's food is a modern reflection of an ancient culture, featuring crispy falafel and savory schnitzel to world-renowned hummus and sweet malabi.

Albuquerque

Albuquerque is a delicious desert hotspot that's rich in Native American and Spanish traditions and the local cuisine reflects a unique mash-up of cultures. From stacked enchiladas loaded with green chile and a fried egg to spicy Tewa tacos on Indian fry bread, locals in this state say, if there's no chile in the house, there's no food!

Austin

Andrew Zimmern uncovers the one-of-a-kind tastes of Austin, a city known for "keeping things weird." The city excels at meaty classics like barbecued brisket, Texas-style chili and chicken-fried steak.

Bogota

Andrew Zimmern explores the sky-high flavors of Bogota, Colombia. This mountaintop city keeps warm with hearty potato soup, roasted stuffed pork, egg-filled arepas, a unique take on the tamale and cheesy hot chocolate.

Charleston

Andrew Zimmern explores the iconic dishes of Charleston, SC. Known for its low country culinary style and high-class hospitality, this charming city offers coastal classics like shrimp and grits, she-crab soup and, of course, barbecue.

Louisville, Kentucky

Andrew Zimmern unveils the favorite flavors of Louisville, KY. This historic town balances country classics like the Hot Brown and burgoo stew with ingenious icons like derby pie and mutton barbecue for a true taste of Americana.

Puerto Rico

Andrew Zimmern digs into the diversity of San Juan, Puerto Rico, where pork is king. San Juan is a food paradise that includes a comfort food classic packed with pork, deep-fried beach eats and a Puerto Rican take on lasagna.

Houston

Andrew uncovers Houston's eclectic eats. From Tex-Mex steak fajitas and cheesy Czech pastries, to Creole classics, Gulf seafood and Vietnamese-Cajun crawfish, Houston is a flavorful fusion of Wild West, Far East and Deep South.

Portugal

Andrew explores the iconic eats of Lisbon, Portugal, where seafood reigns supreme, from sardines to shellfish feasts. Late-night snacks are piled with pork, soups overflow with sausage and dessert is a religious experience, too.

Sicily

Andrew Zimmern unveils Sicily's edible icons. Known for artisanal comfort food such as crunchy fried rice balls, thick crust pizza, irresistibly creamy cannoli and a pasta that will make you sing, Sicilian cuisine is a timeless treasure made with classic Italian passion.


Ingredients:

  • 3/4 cup Greek yogurt
  • 1/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons vindaloo spice
  • 3 Tbsp fresh lemon juice
  • 8 bone-in chicken thighs, skin removed
  • 1 stick salted butter
  • 2 large yellow onions, finely chopped
  • Kosher salt
  • Pepper
  • One 15-ounce can of crushed tomatoes
  • 2/3 cup chicken stock or low-sodium broth
  • 1 cup heavy cream
  • ½ cup roasted cashews, chopped for garnish

Man shaved half head and half beard for driving license Reviewed by Ritz on 05:54 Rating: 5 Angry barber's revenge haircut Reviewed by Ritz on 22:20 Rating: 5

Chef Andrew Zimmern's trick to the perfect green bean casserole? Listen carefully.

On his television shows, chef Andrew Zimmern traipses around the globe, tasting the world’s best foods and giving viewers a glimpse into other people’s kitchens. But when it comes to Thanksgiving, he prefers to invite people over to his place, so he can share his personal spins on the holiday’s familiar foods.

This year, because of the pandemic, Zimmern trades in his annual all-day open house – with family and friends stopping by throughout the morning, joining the sit-down feast, or popping by to nibble a dessert – for a smaller, safer dinner. As he figures out how his own Thanksgiving menu will change when scaled down to only two people, he demonstrates a few favorite dishes. Though he normally makes them for dozens of people, he tells Yahoo Life that these recipes work for either a solo dinner or a pod-full of people.

“When I was little, Thanksgiving was a huge affair,” he says, with three-dozen or more people piled into his Uncle Richard’s home in Connecticut. The dishes he ate at the kids’ table there became his comfort food as an adult, and the basis for what he cooks when he hosts Thanksgiving.

Zimmern updates the traditional green bean casserole into a lighter version that keeps the all-important crispy top. With a Montauk oyster chowder, he draws on his East Coast upbringing to pay homage to the first Thanksgiving and honor the Indigenous people on whose land Americans live. Then, he finishes the menu with his Aunt Suzanne’s super simple caramel pecan bars. But as he presents his own showstoppers, he also gives tips and tricks to make the holiday meal special, whether cooking his recipes or your own family favorites.

Steamed Green Beans with Toasted Almond-Mushroom Pesto

Even without an all-day party to prepare for, Zimmern still takes the opportunity to get a head start on his green beans with toasted almond-mushroom pesto. The healthful spin on the condensed-soup classic casserole keeps all of the flavor, he jokes, but none of the gloppiness. By mixing up the pesto and steaming the beans the previous day, he can simply sauté them together before serving – using just one pan and freeing up oven space.

“You use all five senses when you cook,” he points out. But while most people know to touch, taste, smell, and watch their food, he listens carefully to the pesto to understand when to add the mushroom and almond mix, and to know when it reaches ideal crispness. When he first puts the butter in the pan, the spattering sound stems from the water evaporating out of the fat. When it quiets down, the butter solids start to brown, signaling to add the pesto. As that releases its juices – as necessary before it can crisp – he keeps everything in one pan by placing the green beans on top, letting them reheat right in the steam of their future toppings. Then, the pesto alerts him as it finishes cooking: “The pan changed its tone,” he says. “The music of the pan changed I can tell the liquid is gone.”

Ingredients

2 pounds green beans, tipped and trimmed

12 ounces stemmed and sliced mushrooms (cremini and shiitake are a nice mix for this dish)

1 tablespoons fresh tarragon

1 cup toasted sliced almonds

Sea salt and white pepper to taste

Toasted almonds for garnish (optional)

Instructions

Servings: 6-8 people

Place the oil in a large no-stick skillet. Saute the mushrooms until browned. Add the onion and garlic and saute until glassy and just turning color

Pull from heat. Add the tarragon and cool for 5 minutes.

Pulse puree the mushroom mixture in the food processor, being careful not to overmix. Add the almonds, lemon juice and soy sauce and pulse to combine. Reserve to a work bowl.

Steam the beans until crisp tender and reserve.

All of this can be done the day before if you like

Right before serving, place a large skillet on high heat. Add the butter and when melted and foaming, add the beans, tossing until heated through. Add the mushroom mixture and toss to combine allowing clumps of the pesto to crisp in the butter.

Cook for a few minutes and serve, seasoning with sea salt, ground white pepper and garnish with toasted almond slices.

Zimmern’s Montauk Oyster Chowder with Scallops

After first sliding the green beans into the serving bowl, followed by the crispy pesto mix and a garnishing of additional almonds, Zimmern turns his attention to the seafood soup. Like the green beans, it works well to make ahead. Most years, he keeps a kettle of his Montauk oyster stew with scallops warming by the door for his open house guests to serve themselves as they step in from the chilly Minnesota fall. “It's the best way to welcome somebody into your home,” he says. But even at his smaller celebration, this staple of his ’60s East Coast holidays stays on the menu.

Oysters are more traditional to Thanksgiving than a turkey, because we do not know that turkey was at the first Thanksgiving." Andrew Zimmern, Celebrity Chef

“The very first Thanksgiving was all about the local food that the Pilgrims found when they came here, and the Indigenous people of America,” he explains. “We can honor the folks whose land we live on with food.” For that, he always includes native foods in his feast, such as smoked salmon and pumpkin - in pie, in gnocchi, or roasted. Back then, people could walk into the land for a mile on the surfeit of oysters. “Oysters are more traditional to Thanksgiving than a turkey,” Zimmern notes, “Because we do not know that turkey was at the first Thanksgiving.”

Ingredients

2oz of salt pork or 1 slice of bacon, minced

2 celery ribs, thinly sliced

8 sliced yellow new potatoes

1 large yellow onion, quartered and thinly sliced

Small bouquet garni of thyme, tarragon and parsley

1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper

1 quart freshly shucked oysters, drained

1 and 1/2 cups of liquor reserved (from the oysters)

1 cup fish stock or clam broth, plus more to taste

3 tablespoons salted butter

1/2 pound dry pack sea scallops

Freshly ground black pepper

Snipped chives, for garnish

Buttered baguette toasts or oyster crackers, for serving

Instructions

Total Time: 45 minutes

Servings: 6-10 depending on bowls or mugs

In a large pot, cook the pork/bacon over moderate heat until softened, about 1 minute. Add the celery, potatoes, onion, bouquet garni, dry spices and cook, stirring frequently, until the onion is translucent, about 2 minutes. Add the oyster liquor and fish stock and bring to a boil. Simmer over moderately low heat for about 10 minutes.

Meanwhile, in a medium skillet, melt the butter. Season the scallops with salt and cook over high heat until well browned on one side, about 2 minutes immediately transfer to a plate.

Stir the heavy cream into the pot and simmer until slightly thickened, about 3-4 minutes. Add the oysters and bring just to a simmer. Add the scallops and simmer for 30-60 more seconds. Remove from the heat, stir in the Worcestershire sauce and season with salt and pepper. Discard the herb bundle. Spoon the stew into bowls, garnish with chives and serve immediately with the toasts or crackers.

NOTE: Oyster liquor is the liquid inside of the oysters, you collect them as you shuck them and if you are buying shucked oysters they will come with their liquid. If you don’t have 1 and 1/2 cups of oyster liquor, add more fish stock or clam juice to reach the correct amount.

In a large pot, cook the bacon over moderate heat until softened, about 1 minute. Add the celery, onion, thyme, paprika and Old Bay and cook, stirring frequently, until the onion is translucent, about 2 minutes. Add the oyster liquor and fish stock and bring to a boil. Simmer over moderately low heat for about 10 minutes, until reduced by one-fourth.

Meanwhile, in a medium skillet, melt the butter. Season the scallops with salt and cook over high heat until well browned on one side, about 2 minutes immediately transfer to a plate.

Stir the heavy cream into the pot and simmer until slightly thickened, about 3 minutes. Add the oysters and bring just to a simmer. Add the scallops and simmer for 30 seconds. Remove from the heat, stir in the Worcestershire sauce and season with salt and pepper. Discard the thyme sprig. Spoon the stew into bowls, garnish with chives and serve immediately with the toasts or crackers.

NOTE: Oyster liquor is the liquid inside of the oyster shell. If you don’t have 1 1/2 cups of oyster liquor, add more fish stock to reach the correct amount.

Aunt Suzanne’s Caramel Pecan Bars

Zimmern’s holiday dessert comes from a much less traditional place: He calls them his Aunt Suzanne’s caramel pecan bars, but guesses that her mom or grandmother got the recipe off a bag of flour or on the side of a butter box. He prefers the bar shape to the classic pie, as it allows him to pre-cut elegant squares into different sizes depending on how much other dessert he plans to serve.

The recipe, with its crisp, chewy butterscotch flavor, took him ten years to get from his Aunt and now he adapts it to his own preferences. First, he lays down the butter crumb crust, then adds the pecans and pours the hot mixture of brown sugar and butter over top before putting them into the oven. When the pan comes out all hot and bubbly, he customizes it by adding chocolate chips to only half. “I’m not a chocolate nut,” he admits, preferring to taste the pecans and caramel. When he puts them out for guests, he puts the chocolate ones on top, so any leftovers are his preferred plain ones.

Of course, this year Thanksgiving is going to be different, he says. “But the gratitude that we have for being able to spend whatever time we can, with whomever we can, is amplified all around our country.” And fewer guests mean you can use as much or as little chocolate as you want in Aunt Suzanne’s caramel pecan bars.


Gallery

  • 1/3 cup sake
  • 1/4 cup soy sauce
  • 1/4 cup unseasoned rice vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 3 thin slices of garlic
  • 1 tablespoon minced scallion
  • 1/2 tablespoon minced fresh ginger
  • 1 tablespoon hot-chile sesame oil
  • 1/2 head napa cabbage (1 pound)&mdashroot cut off, cabbage halved lengthwise
  • 3/4 pound ground pork
  • 1/4 bunch Chinese chives or 2 scallions, minced
  • 1 tablespoon finely grated fresh ginger
  • 1 tablespoon dark or regular soy sauce
  • 1/2 tablespoon finely grated garlic
  • 1 teaspoon toasted sesame oil
  • 3/4 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 2 3/4 cups all-purpose flour
  • Cornstarch, for dusting

In a small bowl, stir together all of the ingredients.

Set a steamer basket in a pot of boiling water. Steam the cabbage until tender, 20 to 25 minutes. Transfer to a colander to cool, then squeeze out as much excess liquid as possible. Finely chop the cabbage.

In a large bowl, combine the cabbage with the pork, chives, ginger, soy sauce, garlic, sesame oil, salt and 1 tablespoon of the vegetable oil. Gently stir, cover and refrigerate for at least 4 hours or overnight.

Put the flour in a large bowl. Slowly add 1 cup of cold water and the remaining 1 tablespoon of vegetable oil, stirring constantly with a wooden spoon, until the dough starts to come together. Using your hands, knead the dough until it forms a ball, then knead the dough on a work surface until smooth, about 5 minutes. Transfer the dough to a clean bowl, cover and refrigerate for at least 30 minutes and for up to 3 hours.

Dust a baking sheet with cornstarch. Cut the dough into 4 equal pieces, then roll each piece into 1-inch-thick logs, 8 inches long. Using a sharp knife, cut the logs into eight 1-inch pieces. Using a rolling pin, roll the pieces into 3 1/2-inch rounds, keeping the dough covered with plastic wrap as you work to prevent the dough from drying out. Dust the rolling pin occasionally with cornstarch to prevent sticking.

Place about 1 tablespoon of the filling in the center of each round, then fold over one side to form a half circle, pressing to adhere, or pleating decoratively along the edge to seal. Place filled dumplings on the prepared baking sheet and cover with plastic wrap while you prepare the rest.

Bring a large pot of water to a boil. Cook dumplings in batches of about 8 until they are cooked through, 3 to 4 minutes. Using a slotted spoon, transfer the dumplings to a serving platter. Serve warm with the dipping sauce.


Pepper Shrimp

Using scissors, make a cut from just below the head of each shrimp to the base of the tail, cutting through the shell but not removing it. Use the tip of a knife to remove the intestinal vein.

In a large bowl, combine 2 tablespoons of the canola oil and 1 1/4 cups of the onions with the paprika, chiles and tomato paste. Add the shrimp and stir gently until they are evenly coated. Cover and refrigerate for 4 hours. Bring the shrimp to room temperature before proceeding.

In a very large skillet or in 2 large skillets, heat the remaining 2 tablespoons of oil until shimmering. Spread the shrimp and marinade in the pan in a single layer. Cook over moderately high heat, without stirring, until the shrimp begin to brown, about 2 minutes. Add the garlic and the remaining onions to the skillet and cook until the onions begin to brown, about 1 minute. Stir in the coconut milk and bring to a boil. Cook over moderately high heat until the shrimp are just cooked through, about 2 minutes. Remove from the heat and add the lime juice. Season with salt and serve with steamed rice and melon tossed with mint, if desired.


Watch the video: 15 Foods You are Not Allowed to Eat In the USA